As I see, the data sheet of Exadata x4-2 says Oracle used 10.000 RPM disks for high performance. You probably know that Exadata provides 2 alternative configurations for hard disks. You may pick high performance (but low capacity) disks, or you may pick high capacity (but low performance) disks. Previous Exadatas (x3, x2) had 15.000 RPM disks for high performance, and 7.200 RPM disks for high capacity.

According to the data sheet, Although Exadata x4 uses 10.000 RPM disks, it still provides same disk IOPs (50.000). How does it achieve the same IOPs with slower disks? I’ve also noticed that Exadata x4 with high capacity disks (7.200 RPM) provides higher IOPs than Exadata x3 and x2 (32.000 instead of 28.000). So I’m really wondering how Oracle increased disk IOPs using slower/same RPM disks.

UPDATE: After Teymur Hajiyev pointed that Exadata x4 uses 2.5″ disks, I found a blog post explaining why you may prefer 2.5″ disk drives: 2.5 inch 10K RPM Drives – The New Model of Efficiency

5 Responses to “Exadata x4 High Performance Disks”

  1. Hi, Gokhan. Because X4 uses 2.5” for seek with 10.000 RPM, however X3 uses 3.5” for seek with 15000 RPM…

  2. Ludmil Johnev says:

    Hello,

    I just stumbled on your post and was interested – you do raise some valid questions.

    Then I read the update and had to check it out – according to official exadata x4-2 storage serverr data sheet the drives they use are 3.5″. So who should we believe the official data sheet or…..

    Here is a link from oracle site from where I took the information. http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/exadata/exadata-storage-server-x4-2-ds-2076450.pdf 

    Regards,

     

    • Gokhan Atil says:

      Ludmil,

      Great point! According to this document, one of the differences of X4 is, it uses 2.5″ disks.

      The data sheet of Exadata Database Machine does not mention the disk type.

      You check the data sheet of Exadata Storage Server (which is expansion to Exadata DB Machines). So I think there could be 2 options: The document is not up-to-date or Oracle ships Exadata Storage Servers with slow disks. I’ll try to learn more about it.

      Thanks

      Gokhan

  3. Devesh says:

    Hi Gokhan,

    just today was searching good reading for Exadata to enhance my technical expertise about the same. I found your bolgs very much usefull.

    Thanks

    Devesh

     

     

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